Climate Change Paris Agreement Essay

Introduction: Why is a collective and global solution to climate change blocked? What are the theories of international relations that can explain this and how can they facilitate better cooperation between countries? A comprehensive solution to climate change has been stalled due to the reluctance or inability of industrialized countries such as the United States to take responsibility for their significant share of past and current greenhouse gas emissions. Reducing emissions in industrialized countries is not enough and weighted action There is a lot of misinformation about the Paris agreement, including the idea that it will hurt the U.S. economy. It was a series of unsubstantiated assertions that Trump repeated in his rose garden speech in 2017, arguing that the deal would cost the U.S. economy $3 trillion in jobs by 2040 and $2.7 million by 2025, making us less competitive with China and India. But, as the auditors pointed out, these statistics come from a March 2017 unmasked study that exaggerated the future cost of reducing emissions, underestimated advances in energy efficiency and clean energy technologies, and was completely unaware of the enormous health and economic costs of climate change itself. The Paris Agreement reflects the collective belief of almost every nation on the planet that climate change is humanity`s war to fight it, and reveals America`s climate-sceptics – including Trump – as global outliers. Indeed, the mobilization of support for climate action across the country and around the world gives hope that the Paris Agreement has marked a turning point in the fight against climate change. We can all contribute to the cause by looking for ways to reduce contributions to global warming, at the individual, local and national levels. The effort will be worth the reward of a safer and cleaner world for future generations. In an effort to „significantly reduce the risks and effects of climate change,“ the agreement calls for the average increase in global temperature over this century to be well below 2 degrees Celsius, while continuing efforts to limit temperature rise to 1.5 degrees. It also calls on countries to commit as quickly as possible to comparing global greenhouse gas emissions and to become carbon neutral by the second half of this century. To achieve these goals, 186 countries – responsible for more than 90% of global emissions – presented CO2 reduction targets prior to the Paris conference, known as „determined national contributions“ (INDC).

These targets set out the commitments made by each country to reduce emissions until 2025 or 2030, including macroeconomic targets for co2 reduction and individual commitments of some 2,250 cities and 2,025 companies. It is rare that there is a consensus among almost all nations on a single subject. But with the Paris agreement, world leaders agreed that climate change was driven by human behaviour, that it was a threat to the environment and to humanity as a whole, and that global action was needed to stop it. In addition, a clear framework has been put in place for all countries to make commitments to reduce emissions and strengthen these measures over time.